Racer Marketing – Put Your Best Foot Forward

Racer Marketing – Put Your Best Foot Forward

There were two big stories coming out of Anaheim last Saturday night. One was Ken Roczen’s victory in the main event, but the other might be more important. He showed up for Thursday’s press conference in a high-end suit instead of the typical team shirt and Red Bull hat. What makes this newsworthy you might ask? It’s the fact that Roczen set himself apart from the rest of the field bringing professionalism in the sport to the next level.

Why was Kenny wearing a suit?

So what does that mean for you and your professionalism? Now, I’m not suggesting that you show up to the races in a suit, but you should certainly look at your appearance on race day.

Do you show up with old t-shirts or dirty jeans? What does your pit area look like? Does it present a professional appearance for you and your sponsors?

Professional race teams show up for each race ready to go with everything spit shines and professional. They do this, so their sponsors are represented in the right manner. Their bikes are clean and ready to go as are the riders gear and all pit set-up items. This level of professionalism is crucial to not only representing the people that support you but to your brand as well.

You should strive to match this professionalism.

So make the commitment to make sure you are always putting your best foot forward at the track. Appearance matters.

As always the ideas expressed above are my own, and I make no claims to the success or failure of implementing them. They are suggestions to make you think. Please vet all ideas against your personal goals before implementing them.

Racer Marketing – Create a Video Series

Racer Marketing – Create a Video Series

Here is a great tip to help you improve your racer marketing.

Create a video series.

Everyone has a friend that is trying to be the next big blogging sensation. Why not take their passion and yours to put together a video series showcasing your racing and their video skills at the same time.

The best way to start would be a simple storyboard, so you stay on point and deliver a message and value. Remember, a video doesn’t go away on the internet so do it right. You can interject a bit of humor and fun to show your personality but remember to be professional. After all, someday your kids will see it.

Once you develop a plan, you can enlist your video friend to shoot and edit.

When it’s all done distribute it on your YouTube channel as well as Facebook, and tease it on Instagram and Twitter making sure everyone knows about it. One important tip is to make sure you post natively on Facebook and YouTube, not linking one to the other. Research has shown an increased visibility to native videos on both sites.

So there you have it. A kind of cool offseason project that will pay dividends all season long.

Please send me a link to your video series when it’s done, I’d love to see the results.

As always the ideas expressed above are my own, and I make no claims to the success or failure of implementing them. They are suggestions to make you think. Please vet all ideas against your personal goals before implementing them.

How to Use Your Influence to Drive Sales

How to Use Your Influence to Drive Sales

Influencer marketing has recently been a favorite phrase. Using stars or celebrities to help sell products isn’t new but with the rise of social media and the ability to reach people in a quick and efficient manner has led to the micro-influencer.

And unless your name is Ken Roczen or Ryan Dungey, this is where you fit in.

Do you have a social account on Snapchat, or Facebook, or Instagram, or Twitter? Do you present yourself professionally and in a positive manner? If not, time to audit your account and get it going in the right direction. (Learn more about a social media audit HERE)

But lets for a moment assume your social appearance is professional and suitable to promote someone’s product. Now is the chance to develop a plan to use that influence to align with your sponsor’s objectives and deliver real value. Can you provide a real call to action for your followers and friends? Perhaps you can work with your key sponsors on a coupon code? Then systematically deliver that code to your followers and, boom, you’re an influencer.

The key for all of this to work is having a plan. It can be as simple as a hand written calendar or as complex as you want to make it. Your call. But either way, create a plan and execute on it.

As always the ideas expressed above are my own, and I make no claims to the success or failure of implementing them. They are suggestions to make you think. Please vet all ideas against your personal goals before implementing them.

ROI vs ROO – What’s the Difference?

ROI vs ROO – What’s the Difference?

ROI this and ROI that. They’re common marketing terms being thrown around when it comes to sponsorship or anything that has a cost. Return on Investment. What do I get in return for my investment?

Now determining an ROI on your time, money or product giveaway is important. You have to know what you are getting out of the investment but how do you determine actual dollars earned as a result of this sponsorship? Sometimes it’s easy to directly impact a sale, but often it’s less concrete.

With that in mind and with the interest of actually providing value to a sponsor, I’m more focused on ROO. Return on Objective. And I believe as a racer this should be your focus as well. As a business partner with your sponsor, you should understand what their objective of the sponsorship is. Is it to be more visible in local areas, or to get traction in local dealers? Is their goal to have a sponsored racer in each state or a wide variety of racing types?

These are things you need to tailor to your individual sponsors and why I recommend working with a few good ones rather than a mass amounts of companies. Go back and check out my article (Sponsorship – A Different Approach) to learn more about why I believe working with a smaller number of core sponsors is the best approach for your racing career. Understanding why a company is sponsoring you will benefit you when it comes time to build your social content calendar and enable you to deliver measurable results and value to those that support you.

So there you have it, put ROI aside and focus on ROO for sponsorship success.

As always the ideas expressed above are my own and I make no claims to the success or failure of implementing them. They are suggestions to make you think. Please vet all ideas against your personal goals before implementing them.

Statistics – Proving what you are worth.

Statistics – Proving what you are worth.

It’s that time of the year again when sponsorship directors and marketing department get bombarded with sponsorship decks looking for support for the next season.

Some are very simple 1 or 2-page presentations while some are 20+ pages of statistics and benefits designed to help make that sponsorship decision easier.

With the recent growth of Supercross and it’s robust TV and web package race teams are all using the information to try and sell the team. This is where I have a problem with the data. Small regional teams will tout the live TV coverage to millions of homes, the giant social media statistics of the series and talk about how many people the pit party brings in. While this is all really valuable information, it’s not accurate to the program you are selling.

Let’s be honest, how much of the 100+ hours of TV will your team show up in? How many of those thousands of spectators will even walk by your set-up on race day? And don’t even get me started on the social media stats.

Don’t let this discourage you. I believe it’s all about the perspective and genuine statistics that you can provide to a potential sponsor. We’re you lucky enough to get TV, web or social coverage? Then figure out that value. If you didn’t then understand how to get that coverage. Are you writing a blog for your website? Why not? How about a weekly video blog? Traveling across the country and recording what it takes to be a professional racer. And please keep it professional, one wrong move could sink all of your efforts.

Are you working with your sponsors with on-site activation? You could offer a coupon or QR code on a banner tracking back to your sponsor’s site. Implement a google analytic script in the background and boom, instant statistics. Real numbers not a pie in the sky number from the series.

What about collecting names and email addresses for an opportunity to win autographed gear or VIP access to your pit area? You’ll then have an email list that you can use in the future to not only tell your racing story too but to provide value to sponsors. Websites like Constant Contact and Mail Chimp are straightforward and inexpensive to use and offer measurable statistics like open rates and click-through data. All truly valuable when selling your program.

So it might be too late for the 2017 presentations but take the opportunity to determine real statistics to your program during this season and put yourself in a better position for 2018.

 

Racer Marketing – Gratitude

Racer Marketing – Gratitude

All around the country the season is pretty much winding down. But before you go into winter hibernation or begin your 2017 prep, I suggest you take a little bit of time to reach out to those that helped you in 2016.

There are a couple of different methods that I recommend ranging from the very simple to the incredibly complex. Here are a couple of ways you can market yourself and express gratitude at the same time.

A simple handwritten Thank You note expressing genuine gratitude will go a long way to building relationships for the future. The act of writing the note in your own words and handwriting is a valuable tool in allowing you to understand the true nature of sponsorship. Sure you can send a thank you email but isn’t the extra effort worth it?

How about a thank you video? Something simple can be completed relatively quickly and would not only show the gratitude to your sponsor but act as an additional piece of content for your blog or social stream.

Another great way to say thanks is to send each sponsor a framed photo of their products in action. I have a couple of these at my desk, and I look at them every day. You can work with a local photographer to buy the image and print them locally at a Walgreen’s or CVS. Get a simple frame and send it off to those that helped.

And finally what about getting something custom made for your sponsors. Companies like MX Trophies can produce one-off or small minimum plaques or signs that serve as a great thank you.

So there you have a couple of ways to give back to those that supported your racing in 2016. What other ways do you use to say thanks? I’m curious to hear them, let me know.

As always the ideas expressed above are my own, and I make no claims to the success or failure of implementing them. They are suggestions to make you think. Please vet all ideas against your personal goals before implementing them.