KROC 2020 Race Report

KROC 2020 Race Report

The 43rd annual Kawasaki Race of Champions took place at Raceway Park on October 4-6, 2019.

There were two full days of racing on Friday and Saturday for youth and amateur racing and vet classes. Sunday’s racing was for the Pro Expert classes (250 and Open) as well as intermission races for amateur and mini bike riders. Below you will find results and links to media coverage from the event.

Head on over to NJMotocross.com to see all of the event coverage we put together.

KROC 2019 – Friday, Saturday, & Sunday

KROC 2019 – Friday, Saturday, & Sunday

The 43rd annual Kawasaki Race of Champions is in the books and Lukaitis Photo was on hand for the event to capture the racing action. All of the images can be found at the link below.

Lukaitis Photo images from Raceway Park – Friday and Saturday Photos

Lukaitis Photo images from Raceway Park – Sunday Photos

As always the images are in alphabetical order by the riders “last name” with all holeshot pictures labeled as “start”.

All images on Lukaitis Photo are keyworded by the last name of each rider and have been since we began in 2005. By searching the site, you will be able to find all images ever taken under that keyword.

Images are available for purchase in print or digital forms for as low as $1.99 each. Please purchase the digital download if you are planning on using the image on your social media accounts. There are several print options available. Anything from a standard print to more art worthy canvas and glass prints.

As always, thank you for your support.

MIC Initiative – More Riders Riding More

MIC Initiative – More Riders Riding More

One of the most important items that came out of last month’s AIMExpo was the new MIC Initiative of More Riders, Riding More.

The motorcycle industry is in a crisis. The group of riders that have sustained the business for so long are beginning to age out of motorcycling and there does not seem to be the influx of new riders to take their place.

There are many factors at play that are causing this but the end result is undeniable. As a group, the industry needs to put differences aside and tackle the issue.

The seminar held on Thursday night of the AIMExpo addressed some of the causes and have begun to outline a solution. Stay tuned for more signs of progress in the near future regarding this important initiative.

The complete report from the MIC is below.

The Motorcycle Industry Council presented the strategic framework for the long-term, industry-wide effort designed to boost ridership, get more riders, riding more, last week at the opening session for AIMExpo presented by Nationwide.

Opening day for the nation’s biggest motorcycle show saw a packed ballroom at the Greater Columbus Convention Center, filled with hundreds of dealers, manufacturers, aftermarket companies, service providers, rider training professionals, and many others across the industry. Speakers revealed new findings about the “culture code” of motorcycling; how Americans relate to motorcycles, which is critical in understanding how to reach potential new riders. And speakers provided details about new research into the four steps on the journey to becoming a motorcyclist.  

“This industry-led program will enable all stakeholders to benefit,” said Paul Vitrano, MIC board chair, and senior assistant general counsel of Indian Motorcycle and Polaris Inc. “The MIC is developing this to bring the might of the entire industry together, in order to power our collective future.” 

MIC leadership urged everyone throughout the industry to unify, support the initiative, engage with it, and send questions, comments, and suggestions to newriders@mic.org. An action plan and an initial set of tactical elements will be presented at the annual MIC Communications Symposium in Long Beach, Calif., on Nov. 21.

The presentation was led by Vitrano, MIC Vice Chair Chuck Boderman of American Honda Motor Co., Inc., incoming MIC President and CEO Erik Pritchard, and long-time motorcyclist and media personality Ariana Escalante.

“We conducted exhaustive research into the key drivers that underlie our industry,” Vitrano said. “We knew we had to dig deeper and go further than anyone had previously gone into the real issues that motivate people to ride – and even more important, what keeps them from riding.” 

After months of intense, collaborative work with consulting firm Centauric, it was clear that “potential consumers not only exist, they might actually be out there waiting for us to find them,” Vitrano said.

To reach these potential riders, the MIC worked with Centauric to understand the culture code of motorcycling in America, and to identify the four steps on the journey to becoming a rider.

Information gathered in focus groups, lab experiences, and other research “allowed us to discern our most critical understanding,” Boderman said, “the distillation of the culture code of motorcycling in America, which can be summed up in two words: personal sovereignty.” 

The culture code is “comprised of independence, power, mastery of both self and domain, and being at least a little bit bad-ass about it,” he said. “Personal sovereignty is the essential key to understanding how to powerfully connect with potential riders. It is how most Americans subconsciously relate to motorcycles.”

“We need more riders, riding more,” Pritchard said. “Potential riders are on a journey, and it’s our job ­­– all of us – to provide a roadmap and help them along the way to make sure they reach the destination.” 

Four key steps were identified on the journey to becoming a rider:

  • Inspire – Get more people to take notice of motorcycling
  • Explore – Help more people learn about motorcycling in a way that aligns with their lifestyle and personal interests
  • Engage – Knock down barriers and welcome new folks
  • Integrate – Make motorcycling accessible, affordable, and enriching

“We are working to refine these elements into an action plan,” Pritchard said. “Our industry is at an essential turning point, where we must unify as one body, speaking the culture code of motorcycling, and pulling in the same direction to create new riders.”